Fire station located at Union Street and 7th Avenue in Brooklyn, elevation, architect Walter E. Parfitt, series 233, exhibit C, approved October 23, 1906.
Happy Archtober! This month is New York City’s fourth annual Architecture and Design Month. Archtober presents special tours, lectures, films and exhibitions that focus on the importance of architecture and design in everyday life.

Fire station located at Union Street and 7th Avenue in Brooklyn, elevation, architect Walter E. Parfitt, series 233, exhibit C, approved October 23, 1906.

Happy Archtober! This month is New York City’s fourth annual Architecture and Design Month. Archtober presents special tours, lectures, films and exhibitions that focus on the importance of architecture and design in everyday life.

Photograph by Albert Mozell, courtesy of The Pace Gallery, April 24, 1973.
Today the Parks Department hosts a community celebration and rededication of Night Presence IV (1972) by Louise Nevelson. The Design Commission staff and its Conservation Advisory Group were proud to work with the Parks Department staff and their in-house conservators on this important project that conserved this iconic sculpture by one of America’s leading women artists.

Photograph by Albert Mozell, courtesy of The Pace Gallery, April 24, 1973.

Today the Parks Department hosts a community celebration and rededication of Night Presence IV (1972) by Louise Nevelson. The Design Commission staff and its Conservation Advisory Group were proud to work with the Parks Department staff and their in-house conservators on this important project that conserved this iconic sculpture by one of America’s leading women artists.

Subways and Railways, a set on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Though New York has long been known for its subway system, the city’s earliest rapid transit passenger railways were elevated trains that ran nearly three stories above the streets. The first elevated line opened in 1868 on Greenwich Street, and the system eventually expanded throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. The first underground subway line was opened 36 years later in 1904. The IRT (Interborough Rapid Transit) originally ran along Broadway from City Hall to 145th Street, and later expanded to the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens. Additional subway lines also extended the reach of public transportation, helping to facilitate the city’s geographic growth. Today, New York’s expansive public transit railways include underground, above ground, and elevated lines throughout the five boroughs.
The Art Commission first began reviewing designs for railway stations in 1903, while the early subway was still under construction. A variety of designs for elevated stations, underground stations, street level entrances, and station decorations and signage were brought before the Commission. Since 1953, New York’s public transportation system has been operated by the New York City Transit Authority, a public benefit corporation.  
Learn more about New York’s transportation history at the New York Transit Museum. 
For research inquiries, please visit the Design Commission’s website and submit a Research Request form.
Tablet for the Borough Hall Subway station in Brooklyn, north wall of mezzanine, elevation, designed by the Department of Designs of the Public Service Commission, series 304, exhibit B, disapproved January 14, 1908Tablet for the Borough Hall Subway station in Brooklyn, rendering, designed by the Department of Designs of the Public Service Commission, series 304, exhibit D, disapproved January 14, 1908Tablet for the Borough Hall Subway station in Brooklyn, rendering, designed by the Department of Designs of the Public Service Commission, series 304, exhibit E, disapproved January 14, 1908Tablet for the Borough Hall Subway station in Brooklyn, designed by the Department of Designs of the Public Service Commission, series 304, exhibit I, disapproved July 1, 1908

Subways and Railways, a set on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Though New York has long been known for its subway system, the city’s earliest rapid transit passenger railways were elevated trains that ran nearly three stories above the streets. The first elevated line opened in 1868 on Greenwich Street, and the system eventually expanded throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. The first underground subway line was opened 36 years later in 1904. The IRT (Interborough Rapid Transit) originally ran along Broadway from City Hall to 145th Street, and later expanded to the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens. Additional subway lines also extended the reach of public transportation, helping to facilitate the city’s geographic growth. Today, New York’s expansive public transit railways include underground, above ground, and elevated lines throughout the five boroughs.
The Art Commission first began reviewing designs for railway stations in 1903, while the early subway was still under construction. A variety of designs for elevated stations, underground stations, street level entrances, and station decorations and signage were brought before the Commission. Since 1953, New York’s public transportation system has been operated by the New York City Transit Authority, a public benefit corporation.
Learn more about New York’s transportation history at the New York Transit Museum.
For research inquiries, please visit the Design Commission’s website and submit a Research Request form.

C.B.J. Snyder Schools, a set on Flickr.
Via Flickr: From 1891 until his retirement in 1923, Charles B.J. (C.B.J.) Snyder served as the Superintendent of School Buildings for New York City’s Board of Education. During his tenure, Snyder designed and oversaw the construction of and additions to over 400 public schools throughout New York City. Inspired by the social reform movements of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, he incorporated elements from a variety of architectural styles, including Beaux-Arts, Flemish Renaissance, Italian Palazzo, and Collegiate Gothic. Snyder’s schools are notable for their grand architectural designs and innovative features. He implemented physical and material changes that focused on the health and safety of students, creating standards for school furniture, adequate light and air, safe construction materials, and indoor plumbing. Beyond merely classrooms, Snyder’s schools often included laboratories, gymnasiums, swimming pools, and auditoriums that could be used by the surrounding community, as well as public art. Though not all continue to function as public schools, 20 C.B.J. Snyder buildings have been designated New York City Landmarks as of May 2014. The Art Commission reviewed over 200 C.B.J. Snyder schools between 1902 and 1922. The renderings, architectural drawings, and photographs in this set are examples of these submissions. This photo album was digitized and prepared by archives intern Alexandra Giffen, a graduate student in the Archives and Public History program in the New York University Graduate School of Arts and Science.  For research inquiries, please visit the Design Commission’s website and submit a Research Request form.
Public School 101 in Manhattan, front elevation, architect C.B.J. Snyder, series 336, exhibit B, approved May 12, 1908.Public School 101 in Manhattan, architect C.B.J. Snyder, application, page 1, series 336, exhibit A, approved May 12, 1908.

C.B.J. Snyder Schools, a set on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
From 1891 until his retirement in 1923, Charles B.J. (C.B.J.) Snyder served as the Superintendent of School Buildings for New York City’s Board of Education. During his tenure, Snyder designed and oversaw the construction of and additions to over 400 public schools throughout New York City. Inspired by the social reform movements of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, he incorporated elements from a variety of architectural styles, including Beaux-Arts, Flemish Renaissance, Italian Palazzo, and Collegiate Gothic.

Snyder’s schools are notable for their grand architectural designs and innovative features. He implemented physical and material changes that focused on the health and safety of students, creating standards for school furniture, adequate light and air, safe construction materials, and indoor plumbing.

Beyond merely classrooms, Snyder’s schools often included laboratories, gymnasiums, swimming pools, and auditoriums that could be used by the surrounding community, as well as public art. Though not all continue to function as public schools, 20 C.B.J. Snyder buildings have been designated New York City Landmarks as of May 2014.

The Art Commission reviewed over 200 C.B.J. Snyder schools between 1902 and 1922. The renderings, architectural drawings, and photographs in this set are examples of these submissions.

This photo album was digitized and prepared by archives intern Alexandra Giffen, a graduate student in the Archives and Public History program in the New York University Graduate School of Arts and Science.

For research inquiries, please visit the Design Commission’s website and submit a Research Request form.

nyclandmarkscommission
nyclandmarkscommission:

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!
Girls’ High School, 475 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn – James W. Naughton, 1885-86, rear addition, 1891; Macon Street addition, C.B.J. Snyder, 1912
The roots of Girls’ High School extend back to the organization of the Central Grammar School, Brooklyn’s first public high school, in 1878.  As the student population increased, a new school was erected on Nostrand Avenue between Halsey and Macon Streets.  Only the Girls’ Department of Central Grammar School moved to this facility; the Boys’ Department later moved to Boys’ High School.  The Nostrand Avenue building, popularly known as Girls’ High School (the name was made official in 1891), is the oldest surviving structure in New York City erected as a high school.  The design of the Victorian Gothic building focuses on the central entrance with its tall cupola. (Photo: MCNY)

The Design Commission has a large collection of C.B.J. Snyder school projects, including many that have been designated New York City Landmarks. Check out our C.B.J. Snyder album on Flickr!

nyclandmarkscommission:

It’s back to school this week, and we’re taking a closer look at the designs of C.B.J. Snyder!

Girls’ High School, 475 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn – James W. Naughton, 1885-86, rear addition, 1891; Macon Street addition, C.B.J. Snyder, 1912

The roots of Girls’ High School extend back to the organization of the Central Grammar School, Brooklyn’s first public high school, in 1878.  As the student population increased, a new school was erected on Nostrand Avenue between Halsey and Macon Streets.  Only the Girls’ Department of Central Grammar School moved to this facility; the Boys’ Department later moved to Boys’ High School.  The Nostrand Avenue building, popularly known as Girls’ High School (the name was made official in 1891), is the oldest surviving structure in New York City erected as a high school.  The design of the Victorian Gothic building focuses on the central entrance with its tall cupola. (Photo: MCNY)

The Design Commission has a large collection of C.B.J. Snyder school projects, including many that have been designated New York City Landmarks. Check out our C.B.J. Snyder album on Flickr!


Fire Stations, a set on Flickr.
Via Flickr: Organized firefighting has long been a part of New York City’s history. Groups of volunteer firefighters were first formed by Dutch colonists in the 1640s and the more formal volunteer Fire Department of the City of New York was established in 1737. It wasn’t until the 19th century that volunteers began to be replaced by professional firefighters. In 1865, the New York’s state legislature established the Metropolitan Fire Department to serve the residents of Brooklyn and Manhattan. In 1870, when the new city charter relinquished control of the city from the state, the name was reverted to the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY).  When the city expanded to include all five boroughs in 1898, the various departments were unified into a single citywide firefighting organization. Some volunteer firefighters still remained in sparsely populated areas, but were disbanded or absorbed by the FDNY in the early 20th century as new paid companies were installed.  Professionalization of firefighting also led to standardization of fire stations and equipment. An increasing number of stations were built throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Between 1880 and 1895, Napoleon LeBrun & Son was the official architectural firm of the FDNY. After 1895, the FDNY employed in-house architects, including FDNY superintendent of buildings Alexander Stevens, and outside architects, including Walter E. Parfitt, Herts & Tallant, Hoppin & Koen, Satterlee & Boyd and Dennison, and Hirons & Darbyshire. At the turn of the century, new stations were built with neo-classical details, following the principles of the City Beautiful movement.  The expansion and professionalization of the FDNY is exemplified in the large number of projects reviewed by the Art Commission in the early 20th century, including fire alarm boxes and over 60 fire stations in all five boroughs. This photo album was digitized and prepared by archives intern Alexandra Giffen, a graduate student in the Archives and Public History program in the New York University Graduate School of Arts and Science. For research inquiries, please visit the Design Commission’s website and submit a Research Request form.
Fire station located at Union Street and 7th Avenue in Brooklyn, elevation, architect Walter E. Parfitt, series 233, exhibit C, approved October 23, 1906Fire station located at Union Street and 7th Avenue in Brooklyn, section and elevation, architect Walter E. Parfitt, series 233, exhibit E, approved October 23, 1906

Fire Stations, a set on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Organized firefighting has long been a part of New York City’s history. Groups of volunteer firefighters were first formed by Dutch colonists in the 1640s and the more formal volunteer Fire Department of the City of New York was established in 1737. It wasn’t until the 19th century that volunteers began to be replaced by professional firefighters. In 1865, the New York’s state legislature established the Metropolitan Fire Department to serve the residents of Brooklyn and Manhattan. In 1870, when the new city charter relinquished control of the city from the state, the name was reverted to the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY).

When the city expanded to include all five boroughs in 1898, the various departments were unified into a single citywide firefighting organization. Some volunteer firefighters still remained in sparsely populated areas, but were disbanded or absorbed by the FDNY in the early 20th century as new paid companies were installed.

Professionalization of firefighting also led to standardization of fire stations and equipment. An increasing number of stations were built throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Between 1880 and 1895, Napoleon LeBrun & Son was the official architectural firm of the FDNY. After 1895, the FDNY employed in-house architects, including FDNY superintendent of buildings Alexander Stevens, and outside architects, including Walter E. Parfitt, Herts & Tallant, Hoppin & Koen, Satterlee & Boyd and Dennison, and Hirons & Darbyshire. At the turn of the century, new stations were built with neo-classical details, following the principles of the City Beautiful movement.

The expansion and professionalization of the FDNY is exemplified in the large number of projects reviewed by the Art Commission in the early 20th century, including fire alarm boxes and over 60 fire stations in all five boroughs.

This photo album was digitized and prepared by archives intern Alexandra Giffen, a graduate student in the Archives and Public History program in the New York University Graduate School of Arts and Science.

For research inquiries, please visit the Design Commission’s website and submit a Research Request form.

Budget Exhibits, a set on Flickr.Via Flickr:
In 1910 and 1911, the City of New York organized budget exhibitions in the Tefft-Weller Building at 330 Broadway in Manhattan. These were likely inspired by a 1908 exhibition to show the public how taxpayer money was spent, highlighting waste, and encouraging the reform of government spending. Organized by the New York Taxpayers’ Conference along with the Bureau of Municipal Research, the City Club, the Allied Real Estate Interests, and a number of invited City department heads, the two-week event was held in the City Investing Building at 165 Broadway in Manhattan and included a series of discussions with City officials. 
Coinciding with the beginning of tax season, the City’s 1910 and 1911 exhibitions were largely an effort to educate the public about City expenditures in preparation for upcoming budget hearings. Along with their tax bills, citizens received invitations encouraging them to visit the exhibitions to learn how their tax dollars would be spent. An article entitled the “New York Budget Exhibit” by Leonard P. Ayers, published by American Statistical Association, reported that there were approximately one million visitors during the four weeks of the 1910 exhibition.
According to Ayers, the 1910 exhibition took place on three floors “with 350 booths representing 54 divisions of municipal activities.” Agencies set up their own booths displaying graphs, tables, photographs, and models demonstrating how their portion of the City budget was allocated and making a case for requested funding. Exhibitors were encouraged to make their displays clear and visually appealing to keep the public’s attention. The City spent $25,000 on the exhibition or approximately .016% of the $160,000,000 annual budget.
This photo set includes images of the Art Commission’s exhibition. Images from other displays in the 1911 budget exhibition are available in the NYC Municipal Archives Online Gallery.
For research inquiries, please visit the Design Commission’s website and submit a Research Request form.
Art Commission display, New York City budget exhibit, 1910Art Commission display, New York City budget exhibit, 1910Art Commission display, New York City budget exhibit, 1910Art Commission display, New York City budget exhibit, 1911

Budget Exhibits, a set on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
In 1910 and 1911, the City of New York organized budget exhibitions in the Tefft-Weller Building at 330 Broadway in Manhattan. These were likely inspired by a 1908 exhibition to show the public how taxpayer money was spent, highlighting waste, and encouraging the reform of government spending. Organized by the New York Taxpayers’ Conference along with the Bureau of Municipal Research, the City Club, the Allied Real Estate Interests, and a number of invited City department heads, the two-week event was held in the City Investing Building at 165 Broadway in Manhattan and included a series of discussions with City officials.

Coinciding with the beginning of tax season, the City’s 1910 and 1911 exhibitions were largely an effort to educate the public about City expenditures in preparation for upcoming budget hearings. Along with their tax bills, citizens received invitations encouraging them to visit the exhibitions to learn how their tax dollars would be spent. An article entitled the “New York Budget Exhibit” by Leonard P. Ayers, published by American Statistical Association, reported that there were approximately one million visitors during the four weeks of the 1910 exhibition.

According to Ayers, the 1910 exhibition took place on three floors “with 350 booths representing 54 divisions of municipal activities.” Agencies set up their own booths displaying graphs, tables, photographs, and models demonstrating how their portion of the City budget was allocated and making a case for requested funding. Exhibitors were encouraged to make their displays clear and visually appealing to keep the public’s attention. The City spent $25,000 on the exhibition or approximately .016% of the $160,000,000 annual budget.

This photo set includes images of the Art Commission’s exhibition. Images from other displays in the 1911 budget exhibition are available in the NYC Municipal Archives Online Gallery.

For research inquiries, please visit the Design Commission’s website and submit a Research Request form.